Sunday, June 22, 2014

Separated Polish: Rolling VS Shaking

Sometimes I don't understand the problems that people have with nail polish. Applying even the most finicky little diva is still easier than, say... changing a tire. I mean, it's nail polish not rocket science. Right? I also don't understand people's diehard attitudes about the "rules of polish". Especially when one of those "rules" ends up being more of an old wives' tale...

Case in point: "Don't shake your polish! Roll it between your hands!!" I think this has to be my biggest pet peeve. Shaking your polish is not going to damage it in any way unless you've got serious butter fingers and fling it into a wall. Not only that *cue dramatic music* last night I was afforded the opportunity to test out the roll method with a clearly separated basecoat:



Note the two distinct layers. I guess she didn't like waiting through a week of Yellow Buster and Bonder usage. lol *ahem* In all honesty this started as a way to convince myself that rolling the bottle between my hands was, in fact, a perfectly valid method for remixing a separated polish. My results, however, tell a very different story:



See how the layers have swirled around each other? Rolling the polish for a solid minute did not result in a homogeneous mixture of the layers. If this were base and pigment it could potentially lead to one hot mess on your fingertips.



As I knew it would (I've had to shake this bottle before) shaking produced a few bubbles, but:



They were gone within two minutes. Of course thicker polishes might take longer for the bubbles to rise, but the longest I've ever let a shaken polish sit is about five minutes with no bubbling upon application.

Norma's addition tip (which I used for Boyfriend Jeans): If you have a layer of sunken sediment or extra heavy glitter then just leave the bottle upside-down overnight. Make sure the cap is on tight and just let the heavy stuff work its way towards the "top". Then shake, let rest and apply!

I hope this helped clear up some things. Of course if you just happen to like rolling your polish you're more than welcome to do so, though even the most diehard roller has to admit that rolling brick-shaped bottles (like Butter London) can be downright painful... Just please please don't be afraid to shake it because someone somewhere said "shaking bad". Shaking good! Polish myths bad. I'll be back tomorrow with your regularly scheduled Charmed, I'm Sure. Take care and enjoy the rest of your weekend!! (^_^)"/"

6 comments:

  1. Hehehe!!! My profile pic is in the background of one of your pics! "\"^_^"/" But anyway *ahem* agree. I'd say most diehard polish rules can be thrown out the window. They just do not apply to all polish all the time (for ex 'only use thin coats! <- gah)

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    1. LOL That is you! Yay!! ^_^ Very true. Some polishes just don't like to be applied in thin layers. It's just the way they are.

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  2. DITTO! Omg yes I hate that "golden rule" too! I shake my polish all the time, NEVER had an issue. Sorry but I don't have 20 minutes to roll polishes between my hand.
    Also, especially in winter time, I put whatever polish I plan on using between my legs to warm them up before use, it helps the formulation to become a little smoother.

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    1. I can imagine that it would take about twenty minutes of rolling. Especially for a seriously separated polish. Also! I do the same thing!! lol Except between my boobs. >_> Almost the same thing.

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  3. I think the rolling advice comes from situations where people can't wait for the bubbles to dissipate after shaking--like salons, maybe? Dunno. I shake mine all the time, and know a couple folks who have the OPI pro shaker machines and those really shake 'em up.

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    1. Oh man I want one of those shakers so bad!!! I suppose for salons it would make sense... although it could also be morning ritual to shake 'em all good before opening... ;)

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